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OSHA Dipping, Coating and Cleaning Training Course

29 CFR 1910.123-126 Online Training Certification

This course is designed to help you achieve a greater understanding of the industrial processes that are involved with dipping, coating, and cleaning operations and the hazards that co-exist with these processes. The chemicals used in dip tanks can be hazardous to handle. It is important to understand the risks that can arise from using dipping, coating, and cleaning processes, as well as how to properly handle the chemicals used in their operation.

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1-3

$39.95 per student

4-7

$35.95 per student

8-12

$32.95 per student

13-20

$30.95 per student

21+

$29.95 per student

 
Who Is Taking This Course? (required)

Yourself
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Yourself & Others
Select this if you are purchasing more then one of these courses for both yourself and others. One will be assigned to you automatically, and can assign the remainder at any time after you have completed the purchase.

Others
Select this if you are purchasing one or more of this course for others. You can assign them at any time after you have completed the purchase.
Quantity (required)

Enter the number of persons who will be taking this course.

Governing regulations.
OSHA regulates the use of dip tanks when the dip tank contains a liquid other than water. Standard 29 1910.123 outlines the regulations where tanks are used to change an object through various means:

  • Cleaning
  • Coating
  • Altering the surface
  • Changing the character

OSHA 29 CFR 1910.124 addresses the construction of a dip tank. A dip tank must be strong enough to withstand any expected load and have proper ventilation.

OSHA 29 CFR 1910.125 addresses the construction of a dip tank and the necessary safety controls that must be in a workplace where dip tanks are used.

OSHA 29 CFR 1910.126 addresses the additional requirements that apply to tempering tanks, as well as coating and cleaning processes.

Who must take this course?
Many industries use dip tanks. The chemicals used in dip tanks can be hazardous to handle. It is important to understand the risks that can arise from using dipping, coating, and cleaning processes, as well as how to properly handle the chemicals used in their operation. Being familiar with the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards for these processes will help minimize the associated risks.

Other Frequently Asked Questions

Click to Learn More How long is the course?

It will take a MINIMUM of 2 hours to complete this online course. The student may log on and off as needed. A bookmark will be set so when they log back in they will return to where they left off.

Click to Learn More How soon is the certificate of completion issued?

Upon successful completion each student will have immediate access to a printable Dipping, Coating and Cleaning Operations Training certificate and wallet card.

Click to Learn More How long do I have to complete this course?

We have no restrictions on how long a person takes to complete a course.

Likewise, if you are purchasing for others, we have no time limit on assigning courses. So you can purchase a larger quantity then you currently need and take advantage of volume discounts.

Click to Learn More Continuing education credits?

Each student will receive 0.2 CEUs (or 2 CMEs) from Compliance Training Online® for completing this course.

Click to Learn More Course format.

Our Dipping, Coating and Cleaning Operations Training course consists of content, graphics, audio, non-scored quiz questions and a final exam.

Click to Learn More Course synopsis.

This course presents an overview of dipping, coating, and cleaning operations, including the sources of exposure, modes of exposure, legislation regarding exposure, and ways to prevent exposure to the risks and hazards associated with these processes.

Click to Learn More Course topics.

Specific topics covered in this course include:

  • About This Course
  • Course Objectives
  • Introduction to Dipping, Coating, and Cleaning Operations
    • Key Terms
    • Dipping and Coating - Overview
    • Cleaning - Overview
    • Flammable Liquids - Overview
    • Dipping, Coating, and Cleaning - History
    • Dipping, Coating, and Cleaning - Background
    • Statistics for Dipping, Coating, and Cleaning Operations
    • Applicable Regulations for Dipping, Coating, and Cleaning Operations
  • Operations
    • Dipping Operations - Ventilation
    • Dipping Operations - Exhaust Air and Cyanide
    • Dipping Operations - Electrostatic Detearing
    • Dipping Operations - Tempering and Hardening
    • Coating Operations
    • Cleaning Operations - Vapor Degreasing and Stripping
    • Cleaning Operations - Spray Cleaning
    • Cleaning Operations - Atomized Cleaning
    • Cleaning Operations - Non-atomized Cleaning
    • Cleaning Operations - Hand-wipe flush
  • Managing Dipping, Coating, and Cleaning Operations
    • Compliance - Overflow Piping and Housekeeping
    • Compliance - Bottom Drain and Conveyor System
    • Compliance - Fuel Sources
    • Compliance - Fire Protection
    • Monitoring
    • Record keeping
    • Reporting
  • Controls
    • Procedural Controls
    • Engineering Controls
    • Personal Protective Equipment
    • Training
  • Additional Resources
  • Summary
  • Exam
Click to Learn More How often is retraining or recertification required?

According to OSHA when the employer has reason to believe that any affected employee who has already been trained does not have the understanding and skill required. Circumstances where retraining is required include, but are not limited to, situations where:

(1) Changes in the workplace render previous training obsolete; or
(2) Changes in the types of PPE to be used render previous training obsolete; or
(3) Inadequacies in an affected employee's knowledge or use of assigned PPE indicate that the employee has not retained the requisite understanding or skill.
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